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Occupational therapists, or OTs, work with anyone who may be experiencing physical, psychological and/or social problems, either from birth or as a result of trauma, illness or ageing. An OT’s goal is to help clients have independent, productive, and satisfying lives.
 

A Physiotherapist, or physio, also works with people who have had illness, surgery or injury, using physical methods, such as prescribed exercise, massage and manipulation, to help restore range of movement and promote healing.
 
The activities of OTs and physios often overlap, but the disciplines are focused on different outcomes. An occupational therapist will help their clients to manage their health conditions so that they can have achieve their goals in terms of working, living independently, etc. Physiotherapists aim to maintain or restore physical function. An OT may well work with people whose problems are psychological or emotional, whereas a physio concentrates on physical problems.
 
Speech and language therapists (SLTs) specialise in helping people who have problems with communication, either difficulty speaking or using language; or hearing or understanding language. They can also help with difficulties in chewing or swallowing food and drinks.
 
There is also a wide range of creative and sensory therapies available to carers working with individuals with learning disabilities, autism and a range of sensory and cognitive impairments.
 
What do occupational therapists do? An OT explains what OTs do!
 
Why are OT services so complicated? The OTs’ professional body writes about integration of services
 
Expert suppliers’ views of OT services
 
Physical Therapy – products to help with rehabilitation
 
Standing Support – support and rehab for those unable to stand unaided
 
Sensory Therapy – reaching people with learning disabilities, sensory or cognitive impairments, through a range of creative and sensory therapies
 
Speech & Language Therapy – how SLTs can help adults and children who have problems with communication, language skills, feeding or swallowing
 
Joint Care relief from pressure for vulnerable joints
 

Allied health professionals save resources

£3 million fund for AHPs in Scotland

May 28, 2015

Scottish Government announces Active and Independent Living programme to be introduced across Scotland Allied Health Professionals (AHPs) – physiotherapists, occupational therapists and others – are key to helping people live […]

speech and langauge therapy

Speech & Language Therapy

Speech & Language Therapists (SLTs) also known colloquially as SALTS, work with adults and children who have problems with communication, language skills, feeding or swallowing. There are about 12,500 SLTs […]

Sensory Therapy

There is a wide range of creative and sensory therapies available to carers working with individuals with learning disabilities and a range of sensory and cognitive impairments. This section is […]

Physical Therapy

There’s no argument with the fact that physical and mental well-being are increased through physical activity. Health Education Authority research has shown that physically disabled people tend to have lower […]

Occupational Therapy

Expert contributor Matthew Box, an Occupational Therapist and Disability Access Auditor, has contributed this article on how Occupational Therapists work. Click the links below to go to more on: What […]

Joint Care Pressure Relief

Joint care is an essential element of pressure relief management. Bony areas, such as heels and elbows, are particularly prone to pressure damage, and it is important to give them […]