Functional Clothes

Win Health HipSaver
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There is an increasing array of functional clothes, such as incontinence pants, mastectomy bras, osteoporosis protectors, etc

Osteoporosis hip protectors

HipSaver hip protectors from Win Health (shown right) offer excellent protection for people at risk of hip fractures. Flexible and soft in their natural state yet rigid at the moment of impact, the protectors come in various styles, to meet specific needs, such as incontinence, compromised grip strength, backward falling. They are designed to be worn night and day, for maximum benefit, and are cool and comfortable.

Image of Win Health's hip protector trousersApart from underwear, the same bone protection is also available in clothing, such as pyjamas for men and women, and the HipSaver tracksuit (left), which can be customised to offer protection where required – for hips, knees, shins, coccyx.

HipSaver protective pads are based on a sophisticated, open cell soft foam, which is encapsulated in urethane film. It is fully launderable at 95 degrees C and can be tumble dried at high temperatures. The garments can be washed as normal clothes and the pads do not have to be removed for the wash. The garments are very comfortable, even for night time wear.

The foam in airPads was developed by NASA for use as a lining in astronauts’ space suits. The pads themselves have been designed specifically to cater for healthcare industry.

HeadSaver head protection

soft head protector from Win HealthHeadSaver is a soft, helmet-like head protector designed to protect the head and scalp of elderly and infirm people from fall-related injuries, such as cuts, lacerations, painful bumps and bruises. The head protector is suitable for people at risk of falling and people suffering with medical conditions that make them unsteady on their feet, such as epilepsy, cerebral palsy or Parkinson’s disease.

You can wear the HeadSaver as a sporty-looking helmet on its own, or with a choice of stylish coverings, such as a sunhat, beanie (shown here), or a colourful headscarf for increased discretion and style.

Compression hosiery

image of women putting on compression stocking with Ezy-As aidCompression hosiery can be very effective for managing problems such as varicose veins, lymphoedema and chronic venous insufficiency, and can help prevent blood clots in the leg. The stockings can be very difficult to put on, the more so if you have arthritis in your hands, or any condition that reduces dexterity and weakens your grip. This safe and simple aid makes the job much easier.

Diabetic socks

Diabetic or oedema socks help provide the first barrier of protection against pressure, irritation and chafing of sensitive skin. Pressure being a potential cause of sores and ulcers. They are made from ultra soft, non-irritant combed cotton, with flat seams and no elastic. Lycra and ribbing at the top helps with the fit, and prevents the socks from falling down.

Coping with prolapse

 image of women wearing v-braceNew from Win Health, the V-Brace™ by Fembrace® (shown left) helps women with genital prolapse (Uterine Prolapse, Cystocele, Rectocele and Enterocele), incontinence and vulvar varicose veins in pregnancy. It helps to eliminate discomfort and pain caused by prolapse or vulvar varicosities and reduces symptoms of incontinence, enabling the sufferers to live full and active lives. The V-Brace is a patented garment-like cross-elastic support truss with straps threaded through a sleeve in the crotch of the panty. The V-Brace cross elastic truss supports and lifts the vaginal area, helping to relieve pain, discomfort, pelvic fullness and abdominal strain. The V-Brace also reduces the problems of incontinence and urinary frequency and can even effectively help to minimise perineal oedema following surgery. The garments are available in seven sizes and are machine washable. The V-Brace is a Class 1 Medical Device.

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