Power 100: influential people with a disability

Power 100 influential disabled people
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2016 list of influential disabled people published

Power 100 is the annual list of the most influential disabled people in Britain. It is sponsored again this year by disability charity, the Shaw Trust, and as they point out, choosing just 100 people out of the estimated 10 million living with a disability in Britain, is a challenge.

The top 10 in the Power 100 are:

• Dame Sarah Storey, Britain’s most decorated female Paralympian
• Alex Brooker, TV presenter and Journalist
• Martyn Sibley, Blogger, TV presenter and social entrepreneur
• Liz Sayce OBE, CEO Disability Rights UK
• Dame Evelyn Glennie, Musician
• Ade Adepitan, TV presenter, Paralympian
• Henry Fraser, Artist and motivational speaker
• Andrew Marr, TV presenter and Journalist
• Frank Gardner, Security Correspondent, BBC News
• Baroness Celia Thomas of Winchester MBE, Vice Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Muscular Dystrophy

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The list is divided into eight categories: Arts, Fashion & Design; Business, Finance & IT; Entertainment; Media; Politics & Law; Education, Public & Third Sector; and Sports. You can read the complete Power 100 list here (the link will open in a new browser window)

The individuals were chosen by a panel of judges chaired by Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson, Crossbench Peer, campaigner and Paralympic legend. Other judges for the the Power 100 LIST included Kat Deal, Editor of Power 100, Gemma Hope, Head of Policy, Research and Communication at the Shaw Trust, Clare Gray, Disability Advocacy Adviser, Shaw Trust and Dom Hyams, Editor-in-Chief, Power 100.

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Roy O’Shaughnessy, CEO of Shaw Trust, who are the main sponsors of the list says:

“Every year, I am overwhelmed by the achievements of these inspirational individuals and I am buoyed by the positive impact this publication has had on our society since its inception three years ago. This list plays a vital role in providing much needed encouragement to the young and talented leaders of tomorrow, allowing them to see that aspiration and ambition can be fulfilled regardless of disability or impairment.”

The publishers, Powerful Media, who are known for their Power List and Future Leaders List, recognise disability “as defined by a physical or mental impairment that has a ‘substantial’ and ‘long-term’ effect on your ability to do normal daily activities.”

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Martyn Sibley, number three on the list, has made his mark primarily in online media. He says:

“Some people in the disability world hate the word ‘inspire’ or ‘inspirational’. This is because when a disabled person goes to work or to a nightclub, it’s often seen as inspiring to members of the public. When, in fact, it should be a normal everyday activity.

Unfortunately access, attitudes and regulations make it more difficult. However, us disabled people are not here to inspire other people because of our difficulties. We really just want equality and to live a fulfilled life. Like all humans do.”

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2 Responses to “Power 100: influential people with a disability”

  1. Barry Mardell December 14, 2016 at 3:32 pm #

    I agree with Martyn. I had life threatening injuries as a result of a motorbike accident 39 years ago. My left arm was amputated. I was a Naval Rating, the RN put me through rehab to ensure I could become a useful member of society I was discharged with a 100% War Pension. I trained as a draughts’man and remained in engineering. My wife and I lead active lives scuba diving and sailing until 20 years later an MRI scan revealed an old spinal injury which lead to an incomplete SCI. Medical retirement on a full pension in 1997 and I was a full-time wheelchair user 2001/2. I met new challenges. I discovered I can paint. I became a member of Ringwood Sailability sailing solo within a few weeks though the lake was small, after many years sailing the channel I soon tired of it. A mutual friend lent me a simulator to fly radio controlled airplanes. I got the hang of that and started building and flying model airplanes. I had to stop the flying part 2 years ago due to a pressure ulcer reducing the amount of time in my wheel chair force me to have permanent bed-rest . I had an extension built so that I had an indoor workshop/art-studio. It was completed end of February and I have permission to spend an hour in my wheelchair daily. I have friend’s and carers/support staff who tell me I’m “inspirational” in all I do. But they don’t get the point. I do what I do because it’s what I had done before becoming disabled.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Robotics For Spinal Injuries and Two 'Thumbs Up' For Disability Horizons. - Disabilitymatch Podcast - June 27, 2017

    […] time to catch up with Martyn Sibley as he has recently been chosen as the 3rd top person on the disabled power list which he truly desrves.  If anyone in this community of ours deserves a ‘gong’ he […]

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